Different Like Me

Different Like Me

By Kathleen Freeman

My name is Thomas and I’m different you see,
But a whole lot of others are different like me.
There are kids different colors and kids different sizes,
Kids who win contests and kids who win prizes.
Kids good at math, science, spelling or reading,
Kids good with drawing, at games, or at beading.
There are kids who catch baseballs, and kids not so fast,
Kids scared of nighttime, or dreams from their past.
There are kids who feel squashed when their pants are too tight,
And kids who feel itchy when a tag isn’t right.
There are kids who will wiggle, both sons and daughters,
There are kids who are thinkers, designers and plotters.
There are kids who spin round, or jiggle their hands,
And kids who have crowded teeth in bands.
There are kids who dance, and kids who sing,
Kids who learn about most everything.
Some are in wheelchairs and some kids get sick,
That’s just how we are, and we don’t get to pick.
And some kids remember and some kids forget,
Some kids are glued to their TV set.
Some kids read maps, and some don’t, I bet.
That’s how we were made, and you get what you get.
Some kids pretend, and some like things real,
But really it isn’t that big of a deal.
My name is Thomas and I’m different they say,
My friends are all too, and I like it that way.

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Comments

  1. Rhonda Harding says:

    My son, Christian, is different too, and his differences have made my life richer, teaching me what really matters and what doesn’t, and the meaning of unconditional love.

  2. Ana Perez says:

    I was excusing my son’s behavior with a lady waiting on line next to me..autistic symptoms were all on, she said she had three sons and she wished they had a diagnosis to excuse their behavior… author is right, my son is different but so is everyone else!!!

  3. Judy Sutton says:

    My daughter Kayla is different too, and I’m teaching her it’s okay to be different,and that everybody else is different too.

    Kayla has enriched my life ten fold. She is 14 y.o. now, and it’s been an emotional roller coaster for both of us, but I wouldn’t trade one minute of her for so called “normal” Her difference keeps me hopping and young that’s for sure.

  4. Kelly Jensen says:

    Wow! Aren’t we all different and just looking for a little common ground? Thank you Lord for all the differences. They are what make us unique!

  5. Of course our kids are all different, isn’t that wonderful, each one is their own unique self!! I try to teach my kids to accept everyone for who they are!!

  6. When I spoke of how different my own children were, my mom always said, “Well, if they were all alike, there would be no reason to have more than one!” My son’s differences played a part in making him the wonderful person he is!

  7. I thank ‘the powers that be’ that I’ve been give someone who makes me think differently. I’ve had to discover different ways to communicate with him and it’s helped me become a better, more patient person. My son has taught me more in seven years than I’ve learned in my whole lifetime and I am grateful for him being ‘different’.

  8. Wow – that is immeasurably wonderful! I will share with my faculty and I will one day share with my precious little granddaughter – who is also “different” and excells in wonderfulness!

  9. I love the poem. I wish teachers could appreciate their students differences, and
    treat them like the special individuals they are,
    rather than wanting them all to be the same, and
    not appreciating those who speak out and share their differences with others. The teachers could learn from these kids!!

  10. My son has many disabilities and I am always having to explain why he is different. Most kids are ok with it once they see he is not “hurt” he is just a “normal” kid and likes to play just like them. Adults on the other hand have this instant look of sadness and are so sad for him and me. I just look at them and say he knows no different and he is happy. I love your poem it is very well written and really seems to capture a child’s point of view. Thank you.

  11. After a year of early intervention I learned to be accepting of my sons differences. He is an exceptionally bright and loving child. He is imaginative and an independent thinker. We must remember that our children learn in different ways. There is no one style that fits all. It takes patience and individual attention to help our kids reach their full potential.

  12. After a year of early intervention I learned to be accepting of my son’s differences. He is an exceptionally bright and loving child. He is imaginative and an independent thinker. We must remember that our children learn in different ways. There is no one style that fits all. It takes patience and individual attention to help our kids reach their full potential.

  13. All children should be loved for who they are and who they shall become. The only differnce should be thier address.

  14. I have a son who is different as well and I couldn’t love him more if he were normal (what ever that means…)I have a lot to explaine often, because on the outside he looks like a “normal”kid. he taught me a great deal and together we learn and grow.

    love the poem!

    Nonneke

  15. I am grateful that my son is different! It has taught me to erase all preconceived ideas about life and to embrace the magnificence of all around me.

  16. One of my sons is talented and gifted; the other has learning disabilities. Both are shy and considered to be different by their peers. Neither learns in the manner that is considered “normal”, but who would want to be like everyone else!? Both boys are bright and amazingly creative. Most of the time, they are comfortable with who they are. They are the light of my life and I am thankful for them every day.

  17. Celebrating is what we do when it is a special occasion however shouldn’t every day be celebration? Shouldn’t we celebrate the fact that everyone that walks on this earth is here for a reason that we must explore and glorify the world with. May you walk on this earth in peace and happiness knowing that you are here for the divine purpose of being a parent to a child that will be different then the next and that their purpose doesn’t match anyone elses including yours. Thank you God for differences and for the little person who wrote this poem and woke us all up to the specialness in our differences.

  18. My son is wonderfully different too. He has taught me more than my many years of schooling could ever teach me. Thank god for differences. Wouldn’t the world be a boring place if we were all alike.

  19. Angela Powell says:

    We have been blessed with 3 different children all
    with special differences. They have taught me to be a better person and we now all see that normal
    isn’t as normal as people think. We are an awesome
    family though nerds to some our uniqueness has come from our God. The world is totally boring compared to that. I’m so thankful for the blessings in our lives. I we were all the same how borig would that be? 🙁

  20. I too have a wonderful little girl who is different that started kindergarten today and had a wonderful time at school. God truly blessed me with her. She has helped me understand that we are all normally different!

  21. we were blessed to be able to adopt a different child, and I praise God everyday that He choose us to help guide and help this special little boy in his life adventure.

  22. I have two wonderfully different little boys who definitely make life worthwhile! Although we have “moments of insanity” where it’s difficult to get through the day they have taught me that life is a gift and that normal is boring!!

  23. We just lost our sister on June 2nd. She was 22 yrs old and had Rett Syndrome. One thing that my brothers and I agree on and spoke about at her service is how this little girl in her ‘different’ body that could not walk and could not talk taught us all more about life, love and acceptance better than any parent, teacher or pulitzer prize winner ever could. Her differences made us all special. We know she is dancing in heaven now, do a twirl for me sis!

  24. Dear Jessica,

    I am sorry for your loss but I an happy for the gift that your sister has bestowed upon you. Part of our own journey is to learn and pass it on. Thank you for sharing such a personal story.

  25. To Karen, who wrote: “I wish teachers could appreciate their students differences, and
    treat them like the special individuals they are,
    rather than wanting them all to be the same, and
    not appreciating those who speak out and share their differences with others. The teachers could learn from these kids!”

    Please, don’t lump ALL teachers together in your assumption that we don’t treat our kids like individuals! We are teaching them to BE individuals and not follow the crowd as much as possible. Middle school students, particularly, are at an age where they are coming into their own, defining their own character, and more often than not, they choose to define their character by the examples of others. We, their teachers, try to be the examples they need, but oftentimes they choose to follow their peers’ examples and end up in a lot of trouble. The best we can do is teach them what we know about being individuals ourselves and hope they find their own way.